Hello World, It’s Kougeki (Japanese – English Gaming)!

Published September 23, 2021 Comments: 0
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I have launched a project I’ve had sitting around for a while now called Kougeki. It is essentially a Japanese learning blog centered around video gaming. You could say it’s Japanese studies the gamer way. Here is a reprint of the introductory article on Kougeki. This blog is about Japanese – English Gaming. It’s essentially a blog that translates, in detail, Japanese games into English to create study aids. I hope that in doing so, I (Asher Wolfstein) can help raise awareness of the Japanese language (that I love) and of Japanese gaming throughout the English-speaking world. I have started this blog as a study aid for you, my readers, and as a study aid and practice for myself. Through writing this blog, I hope to increase my knowledge and proficiency in the Japanese language, and of course, I also hope you do. ... [Read More]

Chraki: Speaking, Thinking, Dreaming The Future

Published December 12, 2020 Comments: 0
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The mission for Chraki is as follows: Provide a consistently effective modeling environment for experiential reality, via fundamental abstract organizational processes, that allows for maximum (not optimal) expressive power and freedom in an aesthetically unique and engaging way that celebrates unconventionality and individualism. Due to part of the mission being “maximum … expressive power” we have the following guideline for design: Expressiveness – The first and by far most important design principle to adhere to is one of expressive power. Simply because Chraki can be used for “dry” practical purposes does not preclude it from being nuanced and detailed in its varied expression. This is the guiding principle that drives such decisions as making every “codification” (word) able to be used in any form (adverb, adjective, verb, etc.) I interpret this to mean: even if something may be nonsense, one should still be equally able to construct it. This isn’t groundbreaking. You can construct nonsense using just about any language although you may have to break a few grammatical rules. This is an important distinction though. Once you expect or know that a codification may fall into any lexical category it will influence how you might go about its definition. Likewise, a writer/reader may find new meaning in using a codification in an unexpected way. This may not be as easily expressed in more standard language construction. This separation also serves to drive home the philosophical ideology that abstract thought occurs without the allegedly necessary language (the signifier). This is opposed to the other way around. ... [Read More]

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