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Archival Posts

These are posts from previous incarnations of my blog. They catalog old writing, (abandoned) projects, and else-wise content I have written in the past that others have found engaging or useful. You'll notice the sidebars reflect the content of the archival posts rather than my current blog; for current posts click on the logo above.

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Japanese Hiragana “H”, “B”, and “P” Syllables

These are the first videos I’ve made in this manner, and we made these in a public place (Starbucks, shocker) so the sound is wonky. But, here is the video explaining the cards, and the “H”, “B”, and “P” sounds of Japanese. Please pardon my pronunciation, I’m completely self-taught and so I probably do it a bit wrong.

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What Is Linguistics: An Introduction

Linguistics is a deep field, and not necessarily an always well documented. I’m looking forward to delving into further details of the study of linguistics particularly as it pertains to artificial language construction and artificial intelligence. I hope this article was helpful in maybe clearing up or helping focus what linguistics means today, and that you found it useful.

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Japanese Hiragana “T” and “D” Syllables

These are the first videos I’ve made in this manner, and we made these in a public place (Starbucks, shocker) so the sound is wonky. But, here is the video explaining the cards, and the “T” and “D” sounds of Japanese. Please pardon my pronunciation, I’m completely self-taught and so I probably do it a bit wrong.

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Japanese Hiragana “S” and “Z” Syllables

These are the first videos I’ve made in this manner, and we made these in a public place (Starbucks, shocker) so the sound is wonky. But, here is the video explaining the cards, and the “S” and “Z” sounds of Japanese. Please pardon my pronunciation, I’m completely self-taught and so I probably do it a bit wrong.

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Japanese Hiragana “K” and “G” Syllables

These are the first videos I’ve made in this manner, and we made these in a public place (Starbucks, shocker) so the sound is wonky. But, here is the video explaining the cards, and the “K” and “G” sounds of Japanese. Please pardon my pronunciation, I’m completely self-taught and so I probably do it a bit wrong.

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Japanese Hiragana “Vowels” (Pure) Sounds

The Japanese writing system is split into three parts. Two of these are syllabaries, and the last is a collection of symbols. Japanese doesn’t have an ‘alphabet’ so to speak, as it does a ‘syllabary’, or symbols associated with monosyllabic phonemes. There are two sets of symbols associated with these sounds, one called Hiragana which is used for native words, and one called Katakana which is used for borrowed words or emphasis.

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Setting Up A Local GitHub Hosted PHP Project on OS X

It’s not too hard to set up a basic command line PHP coding environment using github, composer, and phpunit. This tutorial covered how to set up the development environment if you’re using php purely from the command line. This tutorial did not cover *AMP installations.

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What Is Philosophy?

Philosophy was one of those subjects that you learned about on your own, apart from school. It was a place where I could shoot ideas out into it and see where they go, no textbook, no teacher. I probably drove my brother crazy with all my, often hare brained, ideas and beliefs.

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Super Power NecoMimi Ears!

When I first built my short lived fursuit Larry the Lab Rat, I wanted to have moving ears. So, I found this thing on the internet called NecoMimi ears. They’re ears that move according to your brainwaves. They were incredible. They operated by using a sensor on your temple and one hooked to your ear. The ears would move depending on your mood. Well, it kind of worked, either that or my brain is really jittery. However, it had some problems. I had to embed the thing into my rat head. Even though the head was close to my head it was difficult to get the device on. For one, it was hard to access the batteries, for another we had to make sure the ears were clear. However, I needed the batteries to be external to the head. I couldn’t change the batteries while it was in my head, and it would be easier if I could connect batteries externally. My half-brother Ian suggested I extend the battery life of the device if I was going to put the batteries on the outside. I discovered that if I add more batteries to the circuit, anywhere on the circuit, that would extend the life of the necomimi.

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